Sabrina C. Agarwal

Sabrina C. Agarwal's picture
Associate Professor
Special Interests: 
Bioarchaeology, biological and evolutionary anthropology, osteology and osteoporosis, health and disease, paleopathology.
Research: 

Dr. Agarwal’s research interests are focused broadly upon the age, sex and gender-related changes in bone quantity and quality, particularly the application of biocultural and developmental approaches to the study of bone maintenance and fragility. More recently, she is particularly interested in the application of research in bone maintenance to dialogues of social identity and embodiment in bioarchaeology. She has examined age-related changes in cortical bone microstructure, trabecular architecture, and mineral density in several British archaeological populations, and is currently examining the long-term effect of growth and reproduction (parity and lactation) on the human and non-human primate maternal skeleton, studying samples from Turkey, Japan, and California.

Profile: 

I received my B.A. and M.Sc from the University of Toronto, and Ph.D in 2001 from the same institution, working in both the Department of Anthropology and the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto. I enjoyed the following two years as a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at McMaster University, and subsequently was a faculty member for one year at the University of Toronto before coming to UC Berkeley.

My research interests are focused broadly upon the age and sex-related changes in bone quantity and quality, and I am particularly interested in the application of biocultural and evolutionary approaches to the study of bone fragility. My work has examined age-related changes in cortical bone microstructure, trabecular architecture, and mineral density in several British archaeological populations, and I am currently examining the long-term effect of parity and lactation on the human and non-human primate maternal skeleton.

Office: 
Office 212 College, Lab 195 Kroeber
Phone: 
Office 2-4489, Lab 3-8393
Office Hours: 
Wed 1:30-2:30pm
Representative Publications: 

Selected recent publications

*Agarwal, SC, Glencross, B (2009) Bone Loss and Fragility Through the Lifecycle: A Paleopathological Perspective. In: Moffat, T, and Prowse, T (eds). Biosocial Perspectives on Human Diet and Nutrition. Berghahn Press (Oxford, New York)

*Agarwal, S.C., and Grynpas, M.D. 2009. Measuring and Interpreting Age-related Loss of Vertebral Bone Mineral Density in a Medieval Population. American Journal of Physical Anthropology Volume 139 Issue 2 , Pages 109 - 277

*Agarwal, S.C. (2008). Light and Broken Bones: Examining and Interpreting Bone Loss and Osteoporosis in Past Populations. In: Katzenberg, AK and Saunders, S. (Eds) Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton (2nd ed). Wiley-Liss: NY

*Nelson, D.A., Sauer, N., and Agarwal, S.C. (2004). Evolutionary aspects of bone health: Development in early human populations.  In:  Holick M and Dawson-Hughes B, (eds). Nutrition and Bone Health. Totowa NJ: Humana Press Inc.

*Agarwal, S.C., M. Dimitriu, and M.D. Grynpas. Medieval Trabecular Bone Architecture: The Influence of Age, Sex and Lifestyle. (2004). American Journal of Physical Anthropology 124(1):33-44.

Agarwal, S.C., and Stout, S.D. (eds.) Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An Anthropological Perspective. (2004). Kluwer Plenum Academic Press.

Agarwal, S.C., and Stuart-Macadam, P. 2004. Reproduction and the Female Skeleton. In: Agarwal, S.C., and Stout, S.D. (eds.). Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An Anthropological Perspective. Kluwer Plenum Academic Press.

Brickley, M.B. and Agarwal, S.C. 2004. Techniques for the Investigation of Age-Related Bone Loss and Osteoporosis in Archaeological Bone. In: Agarwal, S.C., and Stout, S.D. (eds). Bone Loss and Osteoporosis: An Anthropological Perspective. Kluwer Plenum Academic Press.

*Nelson, D.A., Sauer, N., and Agarwal, S.C. (2002). Evolutionary Aspects of Bone Health Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism. 1(3):169-179.

*Agarwal, S.C., and Grynpas, M.D. (1996). Bone Quantity and Quality in Past Populations. The Anatomical Record. 246:423-432.

 

External links

Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

Books