Special Topics: Language and Global Health

Language and Global Health
Course Number: 
189
Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2017
Section: 
003
Location: 
2251 College 101
Instructor: 
Briggs, C L
Units: 
4
Time: 
Tu Th 11 - 12:30 pm
CCN: 
31479

Health is an area in which dreams and aspirations—as well as acute inequalities—come to be deeply, sometimes fatally, located in bodies, real and imagined, individual and collective. The emerging field of global health brings together scientific and technocratic claims to knowledge, vast amounts of state and non-governmental funding, and struggles for social justice. This course draws together in an innovative way two anthropological traditions to face the many complexities that arise in both researching and intervening in global health. Medical anthropologists have scrutinized global health scholarship and practice, critiquing its dominant modes of knowledge production, evidence, and statistical techniques. Linguistic anthropologists look closely at language, including how patients and caregivers negotiate knowledge and power and the stories that people tell and the songs they sing about wellbeing, illness, and death. Rather than summarizing established approaches, the course invites students from a variety of backgrounds to join in placing these analytics in dialogue in such a way as to produce novel ways of thinking and acting in global health.

Texts: 
Tell Me Why My Children Died: Rabies, Indigenous Knowledge, and Communicative Justice Briggs, C L 978-0822361244 Duke
The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession along the Rio Grande Garcia, A  978-0520262089 California
Migrants in Translation: Caring and the Logics of Difference in Contemporary Italy Giordano, C 978-0520276666 California