History of Anthropological Thought

Course Number: 
114
Semester: 
Fall
Year: 
2012
Instructor: 
Xin Liu
Units: 
4

This course, which is required for anthropology majors, examines the history of anthropological thought from its early European origins to our day. History of thought is the history of its models; this class will focus on how models of thought in anthropology have changed in time, i.e. how our “scientific” knowledge of other people and cultures entails a peculiar history of epistemological and political struggles. These struggles, i.e. politics reflected in the production of cultural knowledge of other people, will be our main theoretical concern.

Location: 
2060 VLSB
Time: 
MWF 12-1
CCN: 
02555
Requirements: 

Three hours per week for lecture, plus one hour per week for discussion section.

Prerequisites: 

No prerequisite is needed but preferably with some basic social science knowledge. Intensive reading will be required.  

Texts: 

 Copies of core texts and other books that are sources of essays will be on reserve in the anthropology library subject to a 2-hour reserve limit.

 

Required Books (available at the Student Bookstore)

Young, A. 1890. Travels in France, during the Years of 1787, 1788, 1789. London.

Maine, H. 1894. Ancient Law: Its Connection with the Early History … London.

Benedict, R. 1934. Patterns of Culture. Boston.

Evans-Pritchard, E. E. 1951. Kinship and Marriage among the Nuer. Oxford.

Lévi-Strauss, C. 1966. The Savage Mind. Chicago.

Geertz, C. 1988. Works and Lives: The Anthropologist as Author. Chicago.

Dumont, L. 1977. From Mandeville to Marx: The Genesis and Triumph of Economic Ideology. Chicago.