History of Anthropological Thought

Course Number: 
114
-
Semester: 
Spring
Year: 
2012
Instructor: 
COHEN, L
Units: 
4

In this course we will explore the history of anthropological thought from the late nineteenth century to the late twentieth-century, incorporating discussion of the major branches of anthropology (sociocultural, linguistic, biological, and archaeological anthropology). We will examine how major issues and debates play out in different branches of the field over this time span, and consider how developments in anthropology might be related to other historical and academic developments. By the end of the semester, you will be able to outline the sequence of major developments in anthropological theory from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century; to identify where major writers fit in time and to discuss the key principles of their theoretical perspectives; and to be able to define central anthropological concepts and discuss their development over time. To achieve these goals, this course is based on intensive discussion of primary texts in small group sections and large group meetings. The course meets three times a week as a whole for lecture and discussion, and you are required to enroll in, attend, and participate in a weekly discussion section. Sections and lectures are integrated and attendance at both is expected and will be the basis for a large portion of your final grade. Reading and discussion assignments will be required for section and lecture discussions throughout the term. A midterm exam, final exam, and term paper are also required. Three books have been ordered as core texts, and will be supplemented by weekly readings made available through a bspace website. Copies of core texts and other books that are sources of essays will be on reserve in the anthropology library subject to a 2-hour reserve limit.

Location: 
F295 HAAS
Time: 
TTH 9:30-11
Section: 
1
CCN: 
02579
Requirements: 

Y

Prerequisites: 

N

Texts: 

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